Orlando is considering rule changes for downtown clubs, businesses

The city of Orlando is proposing major changes to downtown nightlife, including a ban on new nightclubs opening for six months and heavy-security permits for bars after midnight. The city told us that all the cops now manning downtown at night have reduced crime, but now they need businesses to help share the cost. Business owners said it would only drive them out. The city of Orlando and downtown business owners can agree that downtown Orlando should be a safe place. “It’s my life. It’s something I believe in. It’s something I want to see grow,” said Scott Jotrobo of Pine Street Concepts. “We want a fair and just, safe and thriving downtown,” said Commissioner Regina Hill. But when it comes to the city’s latest proposals as to how many disagree, there are two propositions. One is for a six-month freeze on the opening of new nightclubs in the community reconstruction zone. Another would require any business selling alcohol past midnight in the city center to obtain a license and introduce multiple security measures. David Barilla, assistant director of the city’s Downtown Development and Community Renewal Committee, said the proposals ask businesses to help share the cost of any security measures the city and Orlando police have put in place since October. “Right now those costs have been absorbed significantly by the CRA and they can get up to about $40,000 on a weekend,” Barilla said. The after-midnight permit would require police protection and private security, weapons detection systems, ID scanners, occupancy monitoring and would be based on several factors, including the size of the business. Dave Green, with the Orlando Hospitality Alliance, which represents dozens of businesses, says the cost will hurt small businesses. “They’re just going to fail. They’re not going to be able to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to fund the city’s private police force,” Green said. The city told us it will also expand the SAFE program, which would allow eligible businesses to receive up to $20,000. Hill said they’re still working to improve them. “We can find an equal and fair medium to still have that safe, thriving downtown for all but two, where there’s no negative impact on operators where they have to lay people off and then eventually stop.” with work,” Hill said. The city council plans to look at them on Monday and again in February. If passed, the moratorium on nightclubs will come into effect on February 6, and the license to sell alcohol after midnight will come into effect on May 1.

The city of Orlando is proposing major changes to downtown nightlife, including a ban on new nightclubs opening for six months and heavy-security permits for bars after midnight.

The city told us that all the cops now manning downtown at night have reduced crime, but now they need businesses to help share the cost.

Business owners said it would only drive them out.

The city of Orlando and downtown business owners can agree that downtown Orlando should be a safe place.

“It’s my life. It’s something I believe in. It’s something I want to see grow,” said Scott Jotrobo of Pine Street Concepts.

“We want a fair and just, safe and thriving downtown,” said Commissioner Regina Hill.

But when it comes to the city’s latest proposals for how many are in conflict, there are two proposals.

One is for a six-month freeze on the opening of new nightclubs in the community renewal area.

Another would require any business selling alcohol after midnight downtown to obtain a license and implement multiple security measures.

David Barilla, assistant director of the city’s Downtown Development and Community Renewal Committee, said the proposals ask businesses to help share the cost of any security measures the city and Orlando police have put in place since October.

“Right now those costs have been absorbed significantly by the CRA and they can get up to about $40,000 on a weekend,” Barilla said.

A permit after midnight would require police protection and private security, weapons detection systems, ID scanners, occupancy monitoring and would be based on several factors, including the size of the business.

Dave Green of the Orlando Hospitality Alliance, which represents dozens of businesses, says the costs will hurt small businesses.

“They’re just going to fail. They’re not going to be able to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to fund the city’s private police force,” Green said.

The city told us it will also expand the SAFE program, which will allow eligible businesses to receive up to $20,000.

Hill said they are still working to improve them.

“We can find an equal and fair medium to still have that safe, successful center for all but two, where there’s no negative impact on the operators to have to lay people off and then possibly go out of business,” Hill said.

The city council plans to look at them on Monday and again in February.

If passed, the moratorium on nightclubs will come into effect on February 6, and the license to sell alcohol after midnight will come into effect on May 1.

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